red barn furniture commercial

Red Barn Furniture Commercial – Sea Gull Lighting 6519-21 One-Light Pendant, Red Finish with White Cord – Manhattan House

Red Barn Furniture Commercial

    commercial

  • connected with or engaged in or sponsored by or used in commerce or commercial enterprises; "commercial trucker"; "commercial TV"; "commercial diamonds"
  • a commercially sponsored ad on radio or television
  • Commercials – A television advertisement or television commercialoften just commercial or TV ad (US), or advert or ad (UK/US), or ad-film (India)is a span of television programming produced and paid for by an organization that conveys a message.
  • An entity involved in the production, processing, or merchandising of a commodity.
    furniture

  • Furniture was a British pop band, active from 1979 to 1991 and best known for their 1986 Top 30 hit "Brilliant Mind".
  • Furniture (probably from the French 'fournir' — to provide) is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above
  • In typesetting, furniture is a term for pieces of wood that are shorter than the height of the type. These pieces are used to layout type by blocking out empty spaces (white space) in a layout set in a chase.
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
    red barn

  • The Red Barn restaurant was a fast-food restaurant chain that was founded during the early-1960s in Dayton, Ohio by Harry Barmier. Servomation bought the company in the late-1960s and then City Investing bought Servomation in 1979.
  • The Red Barn is a recreational facility at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Located on the west end of the RIT campus, the large, red-painted barn is the site of the university's Interactive Adventures program. It is perhaps best known for its rock climbing and bouldering facilities.

red barn furniture commercial – Sea Gull

Sea Gull Lighting 6519-21 One-Light Pendant, Red Finish with White Cord
Sea Gull Lighting 6519-21 One-Light Pendant, Red Finish with White Cord
Includes Steel Housing, 54-in Chain, 54-in Wire, Instruction Sheets, 1 Year Limited Warranty

82% (>6)

Manhattan House

Manhattan House
Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Manhattan House, an Upper East Side apartment and retail complex, was constructed between 1947 and 1951. Commissioned by the New York Life Insurance Company, it occupies an entire block, bounded by East 65th Street and East 66th Street, Second Avenue and Third Avenue. Designed by Mayer & Whittlesey and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, associated architects, this modern-style apartment house has as many as 21 floors and is notable for its impressive size, plan, massing and color. Considered by many writers to be the first white brick apartment building, it was also notable for being one of the first multiple dwellings in New York City to attempt “an indoor-outdoor synthesis” through the integration of large windows and deep projecting balconies, as well as landscaped driveways and a block-long rear garden enclosed by a low granite wall.

Manhattan House generated considerable media attention and in 1952 received an award from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, which described it as “extremely attractive in appearance and beautiful in detailing.” Future New York Times and Wall Street Journal architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable also praised its design, commenting in 1960 that Manhattan House was “one of the best examples to date … notable for its clean architectural shape, as well as for its superior execution in a highly competitive, speculative, building field.” Such accolades helped attract many prominent residents, including Benny Goodman, Grace Kelly, designer Florence Knoll and SOM architect Gordon Bunshaft, as well as a considerable number of architectural imitators. Few of the white brick buildings it inspired, however, could match the aesthetic standards set by Manhattan House and it remains, to this day, one of the most distinguished examples of housing built in New York City since the Second World War.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

Manhattan House is an important early example of an apartment house shaped by the aesthetics of early twentieth-century European modernism. Though present in American circles by the 1930s, these ideas did not fully enter the mainstream until the late 1940s and 1950s. Considered by many writers to be the first white brick apartment building, it was also notable for being one of the first multiple dwellings in New York City to attempt “an indoor-outdoor synthesis” through the integration of large windows and projecting balconies, as well as landscaped driveways and a block-long rear garden. Built and managed by an important institutional client, the New York Life Insurance Company, Manhattan House changed the way apartment buildings were designed, influencing the plan and exterior treatment of subsequent structures throughout the metropolitan area, especially on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

New York Life Insurance Company

Manhattan House was built as an investment by the New York Life Insurance Company. Chartered in 1846 as the Nautilus Insurance Company, providing marine and fire insurance, the firm started to use its current name in 1849. Insurance companies have frequently used architecture to project an image of integrity and permanence to the public. Shortly after Equitable Life began construction of an impressive headquarters (demolished) on Broadway, between Pine Street and Cedar Street, New York Life built its headquarters at 346 Broadway, between Worth Street and Leonard Street. Later demolished when architects Stephen Decataur Hatch and McKim, Mead & White expanded the building during 189499, this structure was reportedly the first Manhattan office building to fill an entire block and served as the “home office” until 1928, when the company moved to 51 Madison Avenue, between East 26th Street and East 27th Street. Designed by Cass Gilbert, this neo-Renaissance style tower terminates in a memorable gilt pyramidal crown and is a designated New York City Landmark.

New York State first began to regulate the insurance business in 1859, placing restrictions on types of investments and what percentage of assets could be used. Real estate was perceived as risky and insurance companies were only allowed to build or purchase structures that were used to house their offices. In 1922, however, the law was modified and insurance companies were permitted to become real estate developers. To limit risk and benefit low-income residents, maximum rents were controlled by the government and no more than ten per cent of each company’s assets could be invested. Though the law lapsed in 1926, it was renewed toward the end of the Depression, in 1938. At this time, rent controls were weakened and companies were allowed to own properties that were related to, or adjoined, their apartment buildings. The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company was the first firm to benefit from these changes, erecting 54 five-story walk-up apartment houses in Sunnyside, Queens, during 1922-24, and

Manhattan House

Manhattan House
Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States.

Manhattan House, an Upper East Side apartment and retail complex, was constructed between 1947 and 1951. Commissioned by the New York Life Insurance Company, it occupies an entire block, bounded by East 65th Street and East 66th Street, Second Avenue and Third Avenue. Designed by Mayer & Whittlesey and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, associated architects, this modern-style apartment house has as many as 21 floors and is notable for its impressive size, plan, massing and color. Considered by many writers to be the first white brick apartment building, it was also notable for being one of the first multiple dwellings in New York City to attempt “an indoor-outdoor synthesis” through the integration of large windows and deep projecting balconies, as well as landscaped driveways and a block-long rear garden enclosed by a low granite wall.

Manhattan House generated considerable media attention and in 1952 received an award from the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, which described it as “extremely attractive in appearance and beautiful in detailing.” Future New York Times and Wall Street Journal architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable also praised its design, commenting in 1960 that Manhattan House was “one of the best examples to date … notable for its clean architectural shape, as well as for its superior execution in a highly competitive, speculative, building field.” Such accolades helped attract many prominent residents, including Benny Goodman, Grace Kelly, designer Florence Knoll and SOM architect Gordon Bunshaft, as well as a considerable number of architectural imitators. Few of the white brick buildings it inspired, however, could match the aesthetic standards set by Manhattan House and it remains, to this day, one of the most distinguished examples of housing built in New York City since the Second World War.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

Manhattan House is an important early example of an apartment house shaped by the aesthetics of early twentieth-century European modernism. Though present in American circles by the 1930s, these ideas did not fully enter the mainstream until the late 1940s and 1950s. Considered by many writers to be the first white brick apartment building, it was also notable for being one of the first multiple dwellings in New York City to attempt “an indoor-outdoor synthesis” through the integration of large windows and projecting balconies, as well as landscaped driveways and a block-long rear garden. Built and managed by an important institutional client, the New York Life Insurance Company, Manhattan House changed the way apartment buildings were designed, influencing the plan and exterior treatment of subsequent structures throughout the metropolitan area, especially on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

New York Life Insurance Company

Manhattan House was built as an investment by the New York Life Insurance Company. Chartered in 1846 as the Nautilus Insurance Company, providing marine and fire insurance, the firm started to use its current name in 1849. Insurance companies have frequently used architecture to project an image of integrity and permanence to the public. Shortly after Equitable Life began construction of an impressive headquarters (demolished) on Broadway, between Pine Street and Cedar Street, New York Life built its headquarters at 346 Broadway, between Worth Street and Leonard Street. Later demolished when architects Stephen Decataur Hatch and McKim, Mead & White expanded the building during 189499, this structure was reportedly the first Manhattan office building to fill an entire block and served as the “home office” until 1928, when the company moved to 51 Madison Avenue, between East 26th Street and East 27th Street. Designed by Cass Gilbert, this neo-Renaissance style tower terminates in a memorable gilt pyramidal crown and is a designated New York City Landmark.

New York State first began to regulate the insurance business in 1859, placing restrictions on types of investments and what percentage of assets could be used. Real estate was perceived as risky and insurance companies were only allowed to build or purchase structures that were used to house their offices. In 1922, however, the law was modified and insurance companies were permitted to become real estate developers. To limit risk and benefit low-income residents, maximum rents were controlled by the government and no more than ten per cent of each company’s assets could be invested. Though the law lapsed in 1926, it was renewed toward the end of the Depression, in 1938. At this time, rent controls were weakened and companies were allowed to own properties that were related to, or adjoined, their apartment buildings. The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company was the first firm to benefit from these changes, erecting 54 five-story walk-up apartment houses in Sunnyside, Queens, during 1922-24, and l

red barn furniture commercial

Clothes Pole - Cranberry
Dimension: 18.5L x 18.5W x 52.25H
Finish: Cranberry
Material: Wood
Kid’s Cranberry Finish Clothes Pole Coat Hanger
Our kid-sized Clothes Pole has a classic look and makes keeping your child*s room tidy as easy as possible.
This helpful clothes pole will look great in any young kid*s room.
Teaches the importance of organization
Four separate places to hang jackets, backpacks, hats and more
Item also available in White, Red, Blue, Pink, Natural, Ice Blue, Petal, Chocolate, Vanilla and Blueberry
Assembly required


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